ROANOKE, Va. -

"Everyone that comes in contact with him, they go away better than when they came in," said prosthetist Doug Smiley with Virginia Prosthetics on Williamson Road.

Infectious is the smile that belongs to 14-month-old Charli.

His life's been a struggle, but he's too young, too joyfully oblivious to know.

"He's a very active little boy just like any 1-year-old," said Vanessa Carpenter, Charli's sponsor and one of the heads of Angel Missions Haiti. 

Angel Missions is a Salem-based organization that brings Haitian children like Charli to America to receive life-saving surgery.

Kids born in third-world countries and without any limbs don't often have a reason to smile like Charli does.  Charli was born with no limbs.

Carpenter says many children with deformities like Charli are viewed as possessed by the devil. She says these attitudes have changed since the devastating earthquake there three years ago, but they still exist.

That made Wednesday special. Charli got prosthetic arms.

With a few clicks putting the arms on, Charli's life got a little more normal.

Just when you thought that smile couldn't get any bigger.

"Anytime you can see one kind of just take that next step towards what most kids get to experience on a typical basis is very rewarding," said Charli's sponsor father, Rick Jacobs.

Right away, Charli began flailing his arms, trying to pick things up and hold them, but unsuccessfully.

His host father, Rick Jacobs, says for Charli, the frustration a good sign.

"That's going to push him to do things that he's not been able to do up to this point," said Jacobs.

Charli kept trying.

It wasn't until we were interviewing his sponsor Vanessa Carpenter when that little orange football stuck.

Charli just got his arms today, they want him to get used to those before they add the legs as well.

"We'll go on to the next thing developmentally, when he's ready. We don't want to give him too many things at once," said Doug Smiley.

Being born without any arms or legs leaves a lot of things outside a 14-month old's control.

Wednesday was the beginning of Charli being able to take things into his own hands.