DANVILLE, Va. -

The pilot killed in a plane crash at Danville Regional Airport last month was a student pilot who was taking part in a supervised solo flight, according to a preliminary report released by the NTSB.

The plane went down after it struck an ILS antenna, which severed the left wing from the airplane. Dr. Scott Banuelos, a vascular surgeon at Danville Regional Medical Center, was killed in the crash.

The wreck took place on August 29, around 7:41 p.m. The student pilot was flying a Piper PA-28-161 aircraft, which was destroyed when it collided with the antenna of the ILS tower following a go-around maneuver.

Banuelos's flight instructor said that he was flying on a supervised solo flight. He had attempted two landings before the accident landing attempt. During the first landing attempt, the airplane was at a very low altitude when it banked sharp left and sharp right before trying a go-around maneuver.

The airplane landed successfully during its second attempt. After making a full stop, the airplane taxied back to takeoff position and departed again. According to the preliminary report, the airplane completed the airport traffic pattern, but during the landing it banked to the left and struck the ILS antenna. This is when the left wing was severed from the airplane, causing it to crash into the ground and catch fire. The student pilot was fatally injured.

According to the preliminary report, visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local solo flight.

Here is a copy of the preliminary report:

On August 29, 2013, about 1941 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-161, N9089N, was destroyed when it impacted an antenna and terrain adjacent to runway 2 and a post-accident fire ensued at Danville Regional Airport (DAN), Danville, Virginia, following a go-around maneuver. The student pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local solo flight. The training flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the student pilot's flight instructor, the student pilot was flying the airport pattern on a supervised solo flight. Eyewitnesses observed the airplane attempt two landings preceding the accident landing attempt. During the first landing attempt, the airplane was seen at a very low altitude when it banked sharp left and sharp right before initiating a go-around maneuver. The airplane landed successfully during its second attempt and after making a full stop, the airplane taxied back to takeoff position and departed uneventfully. The airplane completed the airport traffic pattern; however, during landing the airplane banked to the left and struck the ILS antenna, severing the left wing from the airplane. The airplane subsequently impacted the ground and came to rest inverted.

The wreckage path was about 183 feet long and oriented about 357 degrees magnetic. The initial impact location was indicated by several broken metal bars from an instrument landing system (ILS) glide slope antenna 39.5 feet above ground level. The left wing exhibited impact damage at the wing root along the leading edge section of the wing and was collocated with the ILS antenna. Ground scars, along with the propeller spinner and both blades, were located along the wreckage path about 131 feet past the ILS antenna. The main portion of the wreckage consisted of the fuselage and right wing and was located about 32 feet beyond the propeller ground scar and next to taxiway "A." The fuselage came to rest inverted and was oriented 129 degrees magnetic. Both propeller blades exhibited impact damage. One blade was slightly bent forward between the mid span point and blade tip with the blade tip bent aft and the other blade exhibited a slight forward bend. Both blades contained leading edge gouging.

According to the United States Naval Observatory, Astronomical Application Department Sun and Moon Data, the official sunset was at 1950 and the end of civil twilight was 2016.

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NTSB investigator Shawn Etcher stated in a briefing Friday that the pilot killed in the fiery plane crash at Danville Regional Airport Thursday night was a student pilot who was on a solo flight at the time of the crash.

Staff members and patients at Danville Regional Medical Center tell us that the deceased pilot was a vascular surgeon.

CEO of Danville Regional Medical Center, Eric Deaton, released a memo Friday informing staff that Dr. Scott Banuelos passed away Thursday.

In the briefing, Etcher stated that the investigation process is extensive. Investigators are gathering information for analysis that will take place off scene. The aircraft will be moved to a facility in Delaware at some point Saturday after investigators have completed the process of gathering information from the scene.

The pilot was trained by an FAA certified flight instructor who had signed off that he was ready to fly solo. According to Etcher, the instructor was watching the pilot from the ground during the flight "as most parents would watch," to make sure everything was okay, but they do not believe he was communicating with the pilot.

No recordings of stress calls have been found at this time.

Etcher did state that the pilot was in the early stages of solo flying lessons, in which student pilots typically stay in close proximity to the airport while working to complete a specified number of solo takeoffs and landings.

Investigators are still gathering data about the incident, including information about how many solo flight hours the student pilot had logged.

A preliminary report will be made available on the NTSB website sometime within the next ten days.

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Staff members and patients at Danville Regional Medical Center say that the deceased pilot was a vascular surgeon.

CEO of Danville Regional Medical Center, Eric Deaton, released a memo Friday informing staff that Dr. Scott Banuelos passed away Thursday.

Dr. Banuelos joined Danville Regional Medical Center staff in 2012 and was affiliated with Danville Heart and Vascular Center where he provided cardiothoracic and cardiovascular surgery services.

NTSB is expected to brief reporters around 3:00 p.m. Friday. We will live stream the briefing here on wdbj7.com.

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Danville Regional Airport was expected to reopen to traffic around Noon Friday.  It's been closed since a plane crashed there Thursday evening, killing the pilot.