MARTINSVILLE, Va. -

Patrick Henry Community College in Martinsville is about to be restructured, which will leave up to 22 people jobless.

Sixteen of those cut positions are full-time.

Ten other employees chose voluntary retirement when offered.

This comes after a year-long process of strategic planning aimed at decreasing costs and increasing enrollment. The community college has had less state funding lately, according to a PHCC spokesman.

The college plans on reducing non-personnel costs by $754,000. That would still leave a deficit of more than $1 million.

Employees whose jobs have been eliminated will receive severance packages and job search assistance.

The following areas at PHCC will be targeted for streamlining: the division of Student Services, division of Workforce Development and Continuing education, and the college’s three academic divisions – STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), PHAO (Professional Technologies, Health Sciences, Accelerated Learning and Off-campus sites), and the division of Academic Success and Student Transfer.

PHCC will establish a Student Success Center, a student engagement center, the Center for Regional Excellence in Arts, Technology and Enterprise (CREATE), and a Career Center.

A college-wide task force is expected to finish a detailed plan this fall.

Here's the press release from Patrick Henry Community College:

Following a year-long process of asset mapping Patrick Henry Community College and shaping an upcoming strategic planning process, the college will undergo a major restructuring and realignment of departments and personnel, including elimination of as many as 22 positions.

The changes are necessary for the long-term financial health of the college and its ability to serve students, according to PHCC’s president, Dr. Angeline Godwin.

“We find ourselves in the unhappy position of having to take drastic measures in order to continue to offer quality educational programs and service to the students and citizens in our service region,” Godwin said. “As the community’s college, we must leverage our talents, resources and passions to serve our students and serve them well.”

The college is experiencing a significant reduction in funding caused by several factors including a decline in enrollment, lower revenues, increased costs and decreases in state funding, Godwin said.

PHCC experienced a substantial increase in enrollment during 2008-11, largely attributed to Trade Act student enrollment, which resulted in revenue growth from 2010-12. State funding declined by 15.8 percent between fiscal year 2010 and 2012, and tuition revenue increased 67.3 percent, resulting in a surplus of more than $2 million, which was carried forward to fiscal year 2013. Carrying forward this surplus as recurring revenue masked a subsequent operational deficit found to be nearly $1.8 million in the 2015 college budget.

A reduction of $754,000 has been made to non-personnel costs leaving a deficit of just over $1 million.

The college cannot eliminate this deficit without cutting additional costs through personnel. Of the 22 positions being eliminated to close the funding gap; six are part-time and 16 are full-time.

“It’s important to understand that it is not people who are being terminated – it is positions,” Godwin said. “The selected positions were determined by the overall cost-saving potential and whether the position is critical to student success. The college administration deeply regrets any negative impact on employees.”

Affected employees will receive a severance package and transition assistance, including resume and job search assistance. The process of identifying reductions at the college began with cuts in non-personnel costs. The administration then began offering a voluntary enhanced retirement package for those eligible in selected positions. Ten employees voluntarily chose the enhanced retirement package.

Following the voluntary retirements, the administration identified 12 positions for involuntary retirement and layoffs. All positions were eliminated according to state guidelines.

Although there may be some variation in dates due to departmental needs, generally the last day of employment will be June 30.

“The college administration has deliberated long and hard to make decisions for the best possible long-term future of the institution,” Godwin said. “While there are no guarantees that there will be no more layoffs, it is anticipated that these actions will preclude having to make further cuts in personnel for the foreseeable future.”

In addition to the reductions in force, the college will streamline and realign departments and services, which will increase efficiency and effectiveness, resulting in better services to students.

The following areas at PHCC will be targeted: the division of Student Services, division of Workforce Development and Continuing education, and the college’s three academic divisions – STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), PHAO (Professional Technologies, Health Sciences, Accelerated Learning, and Off-campus sites), and the division of Academic Success and Student Transfer.

As part of the restructuring process, PHCC will establish a Student Success Center, a student engagement center, the Center for Regional Excellence in Arts, Technology and Enterprise (CREATE), and a Career Center.