Advertisement

Nashville officers hailed as heroes for evacuating residents during bombing

The Metropolitan Nashville Police Department has identified six officers whose actions they say...
The Metropolitan Nashville Police Department has identified six officers whose actions they say saved lives during the Christmas Day bomb explosion in downtown Nashville.(Metropolitan Nashville Police Department)
Published: Dec. 26, 2020 at 8:35 PM EST
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Gray News) - The Metropolitan Nashville Police Department has identified six officers whose actions they say saved lives during the Christmas Day bomb explosion in downtown Nashville.

The six officers have been identified as:

  • Officer Brenna Hosey, who has been with the department for 4 years;
  • Officer James Luellen, who has been with the department for 3 years;
  • Officer Michael Sipos, who has been with the department for 16-months;
  • Officer Amanda Topping, who has been with the department for 21 months;
  • Officer James Wells, who has been with the department for 21-months; and
  • Sergeant Timothy Miller, who has been with the department for 11 years.

MNPD says the officers worked to evacuate people on 2nd Avenue in the city. Both Mayor John Cooper and Chief of Police John Drake called them heroes during a press conference on Friday.

“They immediately began knocking on doors, not knowing if the bomb was going to go off immediately. They didn’t care about themselves, they didn’t think about that, they cared about the citizens of Nashville,” said Drake.

Drake said officers responded on Friday to a report of shots fired when they encountered the RV blaring a recorded warning that a bomb would detonate in 15 minutes. Police evacuated nearby buildings and called in the bomb squad. The RV exploded shortly afterward.

The only known casualties are three people who were injured and a set of human remains, yet to be identified, found at the scene.

The blast damaged dozens of buildings, including an AT&T building, leading to communications problems throughout the Southeast.

Copyright 2020 Gray Media Group, Inc. The Associated Press contributed to this report. All rights reserved.