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Grown Here at Home: Sign up now for Woods and Wildlife Conference in Wytheville and Culpeper

Helping landowners manage their forest sustainably and the wildlife that live there is the goal of the Woods and Wildlife Conference.
Published: Feb. 7, 2022 at 7:28 AM EST
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WYTHEVILLE, Va. (WDBJ) - Over 10 million acres or two-thirds of forest land in Virginia is privately owned. Helping landowners manage their forest sustainably and the wildlife that live there is the goal of the Woods and Wildlife Conference.

“It’s not just managing the trees; it’s managing the whole ecosystem and all the things that go into that,” said Coordinator of the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program Jennifer Gagnon.

The conference will cover several topics.

“From current wildlife diseases like chronic wasting disease, which we do have in Virginia, to creating gardens for pollinators, and we’re going to talk a little bit about Virginia’s Elk Program,” Gagnon said. Another topic that will be covered is emerald ash borer and the state of ash trees in Virginia.

“We do have a lot of ash pre-generation happening in the state, but the verdict is still out with regard to what component of our forest are going to have ash trees and they’re an important species,” said Northern District Extension Forestry Agent Adam Downing.

The Woods and Wildlife Conference will take place at two locations. Saturday, February 19, in Wytheville at the Wytheville Meeting Center and on Saturday, February 26 in the Daniel Technology Center at Germanna Community College in Culpeper. Both conferences are from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The cost is $45 per person and $80 per couple. The deadline to register for the conference in Wytheville is February 11. You must register for the conference in Culpeper by February 14. Click here to register and pay online. Covid-19 policies for each venue will be followed.

Each conference location will have its own set of topics that will be covered, but the overall message is forest health.

“Healthy forests, translates to healthy and viable communities that rely on forest products, which is everyone in Virginia. The clean air, the clean water, the wood products, the economic outputs – these are important for all of us,” Downing said.

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